Thursday, July 30, 2015

YouTube Ann Blyth Book Trailer



This is by way of a book trailer for Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star.  The two songs she sings on this video, "My Foolish Heart," from the Oscars in 1950, and the other, "My Golden Harp" (to the tune of "Danny Boy") from a guest appearance on the Louella Parsons radio show in 1951, are selections probably not a lot of people have heard.  The movie magazine covers are always a kick.

Enjoy.  Buy the book.  Did I mention that before?

By the way, columnist Liz Smith, who featured ANN BLYTH: ACTRESS. SINGER. STAR. in her column on June 29th, mentioned it again the other day, and her recent note from Ann Blyth.  She writes:

I BELIEVED the art and the graciousness associated with hand-written notes had long vanished. But leave it to one of moviedom’s great ladies, Ann Blyth, to restore my faith in good penmanship and a little effort.

Miss Blyth wrote to thank us about our recent column about a lavish new career book celebrating her. She said she hadn’t seen it yet! The handwriting of her note was divine, and so was the sentiment expressed. A lovely woman, and one who apparently got all she could out her career, and didn’t resent changing times and tastes. She had a marvelous run, in every medium. I doubt she has any regrets, certainly not about the inevitable vagaries and disappointments of a show biz career.


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Come back next Tuesday, August 4th when we take part in the TCM Summer Under the Stars Blogathon, sponsored this year by Kristen at Journeys in Classic Film.  

That day on TCM belongs to the lovely Teresa Wright, and my topic is a look at some of her television work, particularly her appearances on the Ida Lupino-directed "No. 5 Checked Out" on Screen Directors Playhouse, and in the psychological thriller "Lonely Place" from The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.

I hope you can join us.  See you Tuesday.



Thursday, July 23, 2015

A few odds and ends...

A few odds and ends today...


These are seamstresses at MGM.  I think they knew what to do with a few odds and ends.

Anybody know them?

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We recently had this comment from David on our post on Tension from February 2012 with some great input on the drug store site:

Sorry to bump an old thread. I'm almost certain the EXTERIOR of the drugstore was the southwest corner of West 6th and Alexandria in Los Angeles. In an early shot, you can clearly see that Alexandria is the side street (via the sign) and that there is a gas station across the street, which is now the site of the 7-11. In a later night shot, you can see what I am pretty sure is the sign of the old Ralphs store that is now Chapman Market. Sadly, the drugstore building itself seems no longer to be standing, but I'm 95% sure this is the correct location. 

For reference: http://www.groceteria.com/place/california/los-angeles/los-angeles-chain-grocery-locations-1932-1942/

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A summer sale on two of my eBooks runs now through the end of July:




Classic Films and the American Conscience - a collection of essays on classic films in the context of the era in which they were made, and...



Double V Mysteries: Numbers 1 through 3 box set - a cozy mystery series set in New England in the post-World War II era.  A little noir, a little romance, a lot of New England.

Both eBooks are selling at half-price at Amazon.

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Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 


The eBook and paperback are available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop. It is also available at the Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street, Northampton, Massachusetts.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Deep Valley - 1947

Deep Valley (1947) is a movie where the telling of the story is probably more important than the story itself; indeed, what is likely to be most memorable to the audience is the poetic cinematography by cameraman Ted McCord.  In post-World War II Hollywood, film noir was sometimes deliciously softened and morphed into romance by introspective sensitivity.

This is our entry in The 1947 Blogathon hosted by Shadows and Satin, and Speakeasy blogs.  Have a look here at the other great bloggers participating.



Directed by Jean Negulseco, we get the feeling Deep Valley was a warm-up for his Johnny Belinda the following year.  The plot is familiar—a troubled young woman suffering from some handicap and shut off from the outside world is visited by an equally troubled stranger who will change her life.  Ida Lupino plays the young woman with a natural, glowing gentleness.  She is isolated on her parents’ remote property on the California coast, and traumatized by her parents’ estrangement.  They live on separate floors of the house and do not communicate. 

Veteran actress Fay Bainter is her self-pitying mother who playacts an invalid to punish her rough husband.  Henry Hull is Ida’s scruffy, resentful father, who perhaps—though this is never really explored—feels guilty for the final argument which tore him and his wife apart when he struck her.

Ida Lupino is their whipping boy, the daughter caught between them, dismissed, used as a servant to clean and cook, but the worst torment for her is her parents’ hatred of each other and their failure to express any affection for her.  The poor girl is starved for a kind word, let alone affection.  Her tearful pleading for a sign of any love in the house once she can finally find the words is heartbreaking. Only her dog shows her any devotion.  She escapes the house when she can and roams the woods with him, finding freedom in the outdoors.  She stutters at home, but in the woods can converse quietly with the squirrel she feeds, and he scrambles onto her back. 


The stranger is played by Dane Clark.  He is a convict on a chain gang who escapes.  He and Ida find each other in the woods, and fall in love.  He is a well-meaning guy, whose quick temper and lack of judgment has gotten him afoul with the law, but he is always repentant afterwards and baffled, frustrated that he almost always does the wrong thing.  He is disillusioned by the world, as isolated from it in his chains as she is a prisoner of her home—but his love for her has a gentling influence.  He finds peace; she finds love and acceptance.

It’s a kind of role in which I think Dane Clark was best used.  Repeatedly referred to, ad nauseum, as the poor man’s John Garfield, Dane Clark did not have Garfield’s strengths, his particular way of playing the cussed and outcast.  However, he had something Garfield did not: a manner of vulnerability that is eloquent and heart-wrenching.  I find I like Clark less in hard villain roles because he does not play them as well as somebody like John Garfield.  There is a mask, like he’s trying too hard.  But give him a role like this, where he can be on a knife-edge of anger and anguish, where he can show his softer side as a tortured soul, and he’s wonderful.

A few particularly great scenes:  when Garfield and Lupino lie along the brook and attempt to catch a fish, their exuberance at their success, and physical closeness leading to their first kiss, so much that we want to cheer the fish too.

The scene where, Dane Clark hiding in the hay loft of the dilapidated old barn, protected from the sheriff by Lupino, and she sneaks up the ladder to check on him.  He thinks it’s the sheriff after him, and to defend himself, he grabs an old scythe.  The long sharp blade glints in the dimness of the barn as Ida’s head pops up into the loft.  We see Clark’s horrified, manic expression as he comes frighteningly close to decapitating her, but for perhaps the first time in his life, he pauses before he acts rashly.  They stare at each other a moment, she is acutely aware of the inner strength it took for him to stop himself.  His tortured, sweaty face bears the look of a man clinging to the edge of sanity.



Wayne Morris plays a construction engineer.  A highway is being carved out of the hillside where Lupino’s parents live, the work being done by the convicts.  Morris, always a dependable actor, here is a nice, boring guy who has taken a fancy to Ida.  She has no feelings for him, but we may wonder if there had been no Dane Clark in the picture, would she eventually fall for the kind but dull Morris?

An interesting subplot is the change in the relationship between Ida’s parents.  When Ida runs off, her mother can no longer wallow in her self-absorbed and utterly phony invalidism.  Fay Bainter gets dressed, goes downstairs for the first time in seven years, and orders her husband to stand away from the stove while she gets breakfast, as if she’d been doing it for years, as if she just left the room for five minutes.  He takes her gruff and grudging take-charge attitude as a sign she has forgiven him, and he becomes gentle in her presence.  They make small talk at the table over breakfast.  This is a simple scene their daughter would have loved—mother and father together, but it only happens when Ida’s absence forces them to, for want of a better word, reconcile.  It’s an intriguing, weird sort of development, but it happens too fast and too automatically to be believed.  There is an absurdity to it that does not match the tone of the rest of the movie.

The biggest problem with the plot, however, is that we know from the start that the romance between Dane Clark and Ida Lupino is doomed.  There is no hope for an escaped convict, no happy ending, and the only relish from the brief relationship for either is the epiphany that they have come to a greater understanding of themselves and have found the ecstasy of love for a few hours.

At the end, we see Miss Lupino and Mr. Morris standing atop a bluff, and he putting his jacket over her shoulders to fend off the chilly breeze.  She walks away, he follows.  It is as if he will be the new man in her life by default, but the emptiness in her eyes that she displayed at the beginning of the film has returned.

What lingers to the viewer are the sometimes stunning shots: The a construction worker silhouetted against bright sunlight; the deep woods; the fine, shabby detail of the house, and the intensity of the quiet close-ups on Dane Clark and Ida Lupino.  It is a dismal story, made beautiful through the eye of cameraman Ted McCord and director Jean Negulesco.

Have a look at the other great entries in The 1947 Blogathon.

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Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 


The eBook and paperback are available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop. It is also available at the Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street, Northampton, Massachusetts.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Goodreads Giveaway for Ann Blyth book

Goodreads Giveaway for one copy of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. starts Friday, July 10th and runs through Friday, July 17th.

Good luck!


Calamity Jane, and preview of the 1947 Blogathon


This is to announce the publication of my new eBook Calamity Jane in the Movies, an essay that began as several past blog posts.  The book is available from Amazon here.  It is to be the first in a series of short books examining Hollywood's treatment on historical subjects, as well as the current events of the era in which the films were made.

Calamity Jane, a real-life historical figure in the American Old West gets a "reel" life in Hollywood's varied, entertaining, and inaccurate portrayals.  Fifty-seven pages, includes several historical photos of Calamity Jane, as well as movie stills and lobby card images.  The book is currently priced at $1.99, but can be borrowed free for Kindle Prime subscribers.

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Come back next Thursday, the 16th, for my entry in "The 1947 Blogathon", hosted by Shadows & Satin and Speakeasy blogs.  Have a look here for a list of great blogs participating in this fun event.  I'll be writing on Deep Valley, starring Ida Lupino and Dane Clark, a gentle story of two tortured souls finding each other and their attempt to escape a hard and bitter world.

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Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 

The eBook and paperback are available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop. It is also available at the Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street, Northampton, Massachusetts.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.


Thursday, July 2, 2015

Independence Day


Independence Day always seems more nostalgic and sentimental when viewed through the perspective of classic films.   Perhaps because, as with Christmas movies, we are transported to our own childhoods, and the weight of the world lifts from our shoulders for a few moments, a world where freedom and civil rights were attainable surely by the second chorus, or if we bought enough bonds.  


They celebrated Independence Day during a brutal and terrifying time of war, yet they managed to convey a silliness that was perhaps necessary to maintain courage.


Peace in our time is a lovely ambition.  

To this end, I would prefer neighbors not shoot off home fireworks (which they have obtained illegally in my state), or firecrackers.  The town fireworks are better, and do not leave burning bits of wood and paper in my yard, or disrupt my old movie on TV with stomach-turning explosions.  James Cagney, and Bugs, and Fred, and Bing, and a bunch of others are waiting in the wings to celebrate this day in a gentler fashion.  

And I like Fred's socks.

I wish all American readers a Happy Independence Day.  Pass the mustard.

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Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 

The eBook and paperback are available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop. It is also available at the Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street, Northampton, Massachusetts.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.


Thursday, June 25, 2015

Bathtub scene - Katie Did It - 1951


A single scene in a movie can stand as a metaphor, or in some way, encapsulate the story.  In Katie Did It (1951), a light and pleasant comedy, one charming scene serves both as a metaphor for the story, and also a teasing reference to the real-life reputation of the actress playing her.  It is, however, the audience, more than the actress, who is being teased.

This is our contribution to the “…And Scene!” blogathon hosted by your friend and mine, Janet Sullivan over at her Sister Celluloid bog.



Katie Did It, for those of you who’ve valiantly or just stubbornly followed my blog for the past year, is a movie starring Ann Blyth, and was the one single movie in my year-long attempt to review all her films that I could not obtain—until the final moment when a friend discovered a copy online and sent it to me.  I was actually finishing the manuscript on my book on Ann Blyth’s career when this movie came to me.  

When I quickly shoe-horned that info into the book, I had naively thought myself done at last—until more material from other fans came through on some other aspects of her career, right up until press time.  It was both an exhilarating and nail-biting last few weeks before publication.

This scene from Katie Did It is a bathtub scene.  Hollywood loved bathtub scenes.  I imagine few ever thought Ann Blyth would film one.

Part of a starlet’s job in those days was posing for inevitable publicity photos, from those glossy, goddess-like images airbrushed to unearthly perfection and lit so as to create a perfect fantasy woman on the couch in photographer Ray Jones’ studio on the lot at Universal, to more whimsical poses with skyrockets, bunnies, beach balls, and various holiday-themed props.  Depending on the prop and the pose, the photo could depict a girl-next-door quality, or something bizarrely sexual.  Surprisingly, one can do a lot in the bizarrely sexual arena with a bunny or a beach ball. Not so surprisingly with a skyrocket.

Though Ann Blyth was known for being very cooperative with her studio and soldiered through her publicity chores like a dedicated professional, she refused, as photographer Ray Jones complained, to ever do cheesecake photos.


In Katie Did It, Ann gamely mocks her own reputation. She plays a prim New England librarian who encounters a visiting commercial artist from New York, whose stock in trade is painting scantily clad ladies for girly calendars, and the occasional billboard cutie using sex to sell the product.  Ann, needing money, consents to pose for him.

I discuss the plot in detail in my book, so I won’t go into it here, except to zero in on the bathtub scene.

She goes to the New York apartment of the artist, played by Mark Stevens.  He works at home, currently sketching a female model lounging in a large tub of water with a few lily pads scattered in strategic places.  He is perched on a platform above her, looking down into the tub.  He’s got a great view.  He got the idea to pose his model this way when, earlier in the film, he had discovered Ann, her clothes piled on a rock, swimming in a stream on a hot day.  He is an artist who takes his inspiration where he finds it.  This painting is for a billboard, intending to sell soap to a titillated public.

Ann is already embarrassed upon entering, as her plan to sell a song she wrote failed miserably.  Humiliated by that, and by having to go to Mark Stevens to pay her for taking her clothes off, has made this one lousy day.

She can barely negotiate with him, her embarrassment is so acute, and so comic. 

She asks, in a thin, wavering voice “How much…?”

“One hundred dollars a day.”

“Oh, no, I don’t mean about the money.  I meant…” uncomfortably, she waves her gloved hand vaguely around her neckline.

“You’ll be up to your neck in lily pads.”  He sends her to a dressing room to change into a swimsuit, which was more than she was wearing when he spied on her in the stream. 

To the credit of the writers, what makes this movie atypical of the breaking-down-the-prude plot is that Stevens’ character is bemused, understanding, and kindly.  Nor is Ann a prude, as we see in other scenes.  Her character’s motto, indeed, the creed of her small community, is modesty, so when she comes back into Stevens’ living room wearing a bathrobe so big she appears to have no hands, we see she is out of her element.  Stevens has to coax her into the tub like a mother with a shy child.

When she finally slinks out of the robe and slips noiselessly into the tub, while he decorously turns his back, she slides so low under the water that he must now coax her to sit high enough above the water so that he might sketch at least a suggestion of her cleavage.  Miserably, she obeys.  Then he tells her to smile.

“I can’t.”  Her wretchedness is hysterical.

He snaps at her to smile, and she instantly beams a beautiful, 1,000-watt, if insincere, grin.

Then the scene dissolves into a wordless montage, where we see the next day she is more comfortable, and as the days pass, she strides across his living room in her bathing suit like a pro, sliding into the water with athletic grace and posing like the most sexy water nymph to ever play hymns on the organ in a New England church.  They go to lunch together and eat hotdogs bought from a vendor on the street.  She gets mustard on her hand, and he wipes her messy hand with his handkerchief like a big brother.  We know he knows he must be careful in his wooing of this young woman, and we marvel at his canny tact.  His infatuation is a given; she is the one on the fence.

Finally, the painting is completed, and she, still lounging in the tub, marvels at it, “It’s lovely!  I mean, your work of course.”  She has come so far as to be able to see the picture objectively as a work of art, something apart from herself.

In real life, the only time Ann Blyth ever did a cheesecake pose was for the posters to advertise this movie.  One imagines, despite whatever discomfort she might have felt, having declared she would not do cheesecake, that here was a young actress with a sense of humor, not only about herself, but about that most baffling thing in an actor’s career—the audience. 

She once commented, “A good part is just that: a good part.  It has nothing to do with who you really are or how you live your life.”  Like the prim New England librarian, she knew the picture looked like her, but wasn’t really her.


The teasing jest may be at the expense of the modest librarian, and the modest actress playing her, but the joke is ultimately on the audience.

Please visit Sister Celluloid for more great blog posts in this fun marathon.

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Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 

The eBook and paperback are available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.

Friday, June 19, 2015

LIVE Q & A today and tomorrow at Silver Screen Oasis

I'm a guest today, and tomorrow at the Silver Screen Oasis, a terrific site where classic film fans discuss their favorite topics.

Join us for a live chat session on ANN BLYTH: ACTRESS. SINGER. STAR.



Thursday, June 18, 2015

LAUNCH DAY!!! - KATIE DID IT - DVD -- ANN BLYTH: ACTRESS. SINGER. STAR. -- LAUNCH DAY



 Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 

The eBook is live on Amazon here. 

The paperback is available from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.


ANNOUNCEMENT: Friday and Saturday - the 19th and 20th - I'll be taking questions and chatting with the folks on the Silver Screen Oasis message boards.  Please stop by and join the discussion on Ann Blyth. Thanks so much to Moira Finnie for the invitation.

You can read (or listen to) interviews with me and reviews of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. at these sites:

Hometowns to Hollywood
Laura's Miscellaneous Musings
Twenty Four Frames
Old Hollywood Films
The Junot Files (YouTube)
Java's Journey
Wide Screen World
Vienna's Classic Hollywood
Silver Screenings

If you want put to your name in for this last daily raffle, please send me an email.  Don't just leave a comment in the comments box because I need some way to contact you if you've won.  Your email will never be published, I will NOT be putting it on my newsletter list, it will not be used for anything except contacting you tell you if you've won, and to ask where to send the stuff. 

Our final prize is a home-made DVD of a film so rare it took me a year and a half to find it. Katie Did It (1951), a sweet and gentle comedy in which Ann plays a New England librarian who saves the day by stripping down to pose for a commercial artist. I discuss it in detail in my book, but that's all I'll say here.  

If this suits your fancy, send me an email to JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and just say something like "Give me the Katie DVD."

If you happen live outside of the United States, that's okay.  I will mail to our friends and neighbors around the globe.  Congratulations to all the winners in this 18-day raffle marathon.  Your prizes will be mailed out next week.

That's it.  Please consider buying the book, or asking your library to carry it.  Or your local bookstore, if you've still got one.  It's the best book on Ann Blyth that's ever been written.

I'll see you next Thursday.

A reminder to those of you in the general area - I'll be giving a talk on the Civil War era from two of my books at the Springfield Armory National Historic Site in Springfield, Mass., on Saturday the 20th, and I'll be doing a book signing at the Agawam Public Library, Agawam, Mass. on Monday the 22nd.




Available from Amazon.comCreateSpace, my Etsy shop, and directly from the author: Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star., the first book written on the career of Ann Blyth.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

1 DAY TO GO!!! - ANN BLYTH on the JUNE ALLYSON SHOW - DVD



Tomorrow is the official launch date of my book, Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. 

Well, sort of.


The eBook is now up for pre-order on Amazon here. 


BUT, the paperback is actually available now from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  I initiated the "for sale" option on CreateSpace, hoping that by the 18th, it would sync-up with the eBook on Amazon, so both would appear on the same page, and this usually takes up to five business days to show up. Unpredictably, they did it immediately.  Of course, if you order the print book from Amazon or CreateSpace, it still won't arrive for a few days, but you can buy it now if you want.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.


Today and tomorrow I'll continue to give away a small piece of memorabilia I've gathered on this journey: photos, magazines, an audio CD of old time radio, a DVD of a film, of a television appearance, a few original lobby cards from Ann's films, just picking the winners from a hat. 

Since a number of bloggers have kindly offered to review the book, I'll link to their blogs throughout the month, before and after the 18th, whenever they decide to post.  Other bloggers will be posting their interviews with me.  If you care to get involved, please send me an email at: JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com.

ANNOUNCEMENT: This coming Friday and Saturday - the 19th and 20th - I'll be taking questions and chatting with the folks on the Silver Screen Oasis message boards.  Please stop by and join the discussion on Ann Blyth. Thanks so much to Moira Finnie for the invitation.

You can read (or listen to) interviews with me and reviews of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. at these sites:

Hometowns to Hollywood
Laura's Miscellaneous Musings
Twenty Four Frames
Old Hollywood Films
The Junot Files (YouTube)
Java's Journey
Wide Screen World
Vienna's Classic Hollywood
Silver Screenings

If you want put to your name in for the daily raffle of stuff, please, also, send me an email.  Don't just leave a comment in the comments box because I need some way to contact you if you've won.  Your email will never be published, I will NOT be putting it on my newsletter list, it will not be used for anything except contacting you tell you if you've won, and to ask where to send the stuff. 

Today's prize is a home-made DVD of a home-made DVD of unknown origins (other than a friend found it for me online) of a rare episode from TV's golden age - The June Allyson Show (Also known as the DuPont Show with June Allyson), in which Ann stars with Gerald Mohr in "Suspected."  Ann is charged with murder. I discuss it in detail in my book, but that's all I'm giving away here, except that the episode is under a half-hour in time length.  It was originally broadcast December 28, 1959.

So, that's what's on the block for today.  If this suits your fancy, send me an email to JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and just say something like "Give me the TV show DVD."

If you happen live outside of the United States, that's okay.  I will mail to our friends and neighbors around the globe.

That's it for today.  I'll see you tomorrow, for the last time, with more stuff.




Available from Amazon.comCreateSpace, my Etsy shop, and directly from the author: Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star., the first book written on the career of Ann Blyth.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

COUNTDOWN TO LAUNCH - 2 DAYS TO GO - SWELL GUY lobby card


Two days to go until my book, Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. is published on Thursday, June 18th.

Well, sort of.


The eBook is now up for pre-order on Amazon here. 


BUT, the paperback is actually available now from Amazon and CreateSpace, which is the printer.  I initiated the "for sale" option on CreateSpace, hoping that by the 18th, it would sync-up with the eBook on Amazon, so both would appear on the same page, and this usually takes up to five business days to show up. Unpredictably, they did it immediately.  Of course, if you order the print book from Amazon or CreateSpace, it still won't arrive for a few days, but you can buy it now if you want.  You can also order it from my Etsy shop.

If you wish a signed copy, then email me at JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and I'll get back to you with the details.


Every day until the 18th, I'm going to give away a small piece of memorabilia I've gathered on this journey: photos, magazines, an audio CD of old time radio, a DVD of a film, of a television appearance, a few original lobby cards from Ann's films.  So stop by frequently and see what's happening.  I'll let you know day by day what the prize is, and I'll just pick the winners from a hat. 

Since a number of bloggers have kindly offered to review the book, I'll link to their blogs throughout the month, before and after the 18th, whenever they decide to post.  Other bloggers will be posting their interviews with me.  If you care to get involved, please send me an email at: JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com.

Special thanks to Annette at Hometowns to Hollywood for her review of the book today posted here.

You can read (or listen to) interviews with me and reviews of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. at these sites:

Hometowns to Hollywood
Laura's Miscellaneous Musings
Twenty Four Frames
Old Hollywood Films
The Junot Files (YouTube)
Java's Journey
Wide Screen World
Vienna's Classic Hollywood
Silver Screenings

If you want put to your name in for the daily raffle of stuff, please, also, send me an email.  Don't just leave a comment in the comments box because I need some way to contact you if you've won.  Your email will never be published, I will NOT be putting it on my newsletter list, it will not be used for anything except contacting you tell you if you've won, and to ask where to send the stuff. 

Today's prize is an original lobby card for SWELL GUY (1946), which we discussed here.  It measures 11 x 14, and, if you happen to be a doctor, this would look great on the wall of your exam room where you have those stupid boring diplomas, or that ghastly illustration of how one's lungs look after fifty years of smoking.

And garage mechanics?  Please.  Throw out those girly calendars, or the posters with the muscle cars. This is what you need to enthrall your customers and get their repeat business.

So, that's what's on the block for today.  If this suits your fancy, send me an email to JacquelineTLynch@gmail.com and just say something like "Give me the lobby card."

Until June 18th, if you want to enter this daily contest more than once, even if you've already won a prize, go ahead.  I don't care.  I'm going to wait until the end of it to send out these items to the winners, in case some of you do win more than once, and it'll save me several trips to the post office if I do it one time at the end. 

Also, if you happen live outside of the United States, that's okay.  I will mail to our friends and neighbors around the globe.

That's it for today.  I'll see you tomorrow with more stuff.




Available from Amazon.comCreateSpace, my Etsy shop, and directly from the author: Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star., the first book written on the career of Ann Blyth.