INDICT, PROSECUTE, IMPRISON TRAITOR TRUMP.

Thursday, December 1, 2022

Lady on a Train (1945)


Lady on a Train
(1945) is the first in our Deanna Durbin Christmas movie twin-pack (come back next week), but though it has a noir title and features a murder mystery, it is decidedly not a noir movie, unlike Christmas Holiday of the previous year, which did not have a noir title but was noir as heck.

Got it?

Just to throw us another curveball, Deanna’s a blonde in this one.  How do they expect us to keep up?


This post is part of the countdown to Christmas coinciding with the launch of my newest book, 
Christmas in Classic Films.

Keeping up with Miss Durbin is a challenge for everyone in this movie, as she breezes through the screwball scenarios like the madcap heiress she is, and has a bit of comic relief to help her: the wonderfully befuddled Edward Everett Horton as the head of her father’s New York business office, “Haskell of the New York Office” as he proudly identifies himself. When Deanna arrives from California to spend Christmas with her aunt, whom we never see, Mr. Horton is charged with taking charge of her.  Fat chance.

The action charges off the blocks from the beginning: on a train pulling into Grand Central, Miss Durbin glances up from the mystery novel she is reading to see a murder committed in the window of one of the brick buildings that border the railroad line into the city.  When our old pal William Frawley, who plays the desk sergeant, gingerly decorating a tiny Christmas tree at the local station house, refuses to believe her, she tries to enlist the help of the writer of the mystery story she had been reading.  He is played by David Bruce, who had a minor role in Christmas Holiday.

Mr. Bruce is a little wacky himself, a self-absorbed, constantly distracted writer with a glib and perennially unimpressed secretary played by Jacqueline deWitt, and a jealous society dame fiancée played by Patricia Morison.


Following him to a newsreel theater (yes, there were such things), the pesky Miss Durbin suddenly discovers the identity of the man who was murdered—a wealthy scion who lived in seclusion on Long Island and is reported to have died by falling off a stepladder while decorating his Christmas tree.  (I know this isn’t a noir, but have you ever heard of anything so un-Christmas-y?)  Deanna knows this isn’t so; his body must have been dragged back to his mansion.  She is more determined than ever to follow the mystery, whether she gets anyone to help her or not.

Playing Nancy Drew, she sneaks out to the mansion, arriving in time for the reading of the will.  Elizabeth Patterson is the old auntie, the disapproving and controlling family matriarch. The family mistakes Deanna for a nightclub singer whom the rascally old man was dating, and are worried she’s there for her piece of the pie.  All are surprised that the nightclub singer has inherited everything.

Wonderfully goofy/smarmy Dan Duryea is one nephew and stalwart Ralph Bellamy is his brother.  There is sneaking around the house to explore for clues, a clever sight gag where she pretends to be a covered-up chair to escape groundskeeper Allen Jenkins, who is truly sinister in this movie.  She finds the old man’s slippers with blood on them, knowing he was killed wearing them.  A clue!  Proof she can show to the police!  She steals the slippers, but sinister George Coulouris, a nightclub owner who has caught on to her, sends Mr. Jenkins after her to get back those slippers.  Mr. Coulouris constantly carries around a limp white cat which he continually pets.  It doesn’t seem like an affectionate act; more like a nervous habit.

Wait a minute, time for a spot of Christmas.  There is a large tree in Miss Durbin’s hotel suite (a tree in everyone’s suite, apartment, mansion, office, etc.), and she sings “Silent Night” over the telephone to her father in California, a leisurely loving version while she is lying on her bed.  In the other room, Allen Jenkins is waiting to kill her for the slippers.


The movie is really a lot of fun, and it is stunning that the fast-paced screwball aspect of the plot is balanced by a very suspenseful mystery.  Danger lurks at every turn, and the tension ratchets up in odd moments.  We get a big laugh at a clever line, and then a bit of a fright.

Deanna gets trapped into pretending she’s actually the nightclub singer she said she was at the theme nightclub “The Circus.”  There is a clever bit with a two-way mirror which Durbin will later have to smash to escape.  Caught into performing when Dan Duryea shows up, along with the rest of his dour family, as well as the hapless befuddled writer and his snooty fiancée, Durbin sings, “Give Me a Little Kiss” in a low, sultry manner.  She teases and flirts with male customers, including the writer, boldly infuriating Patricia Morison.  Deanna almost accidently starts to fall for the writer, and he is stunned to find himself captivated by her. David Bruce is very likeable in the role and after a while, becomes her partner and protector in the search for the murderer, and he actually seems to be a pretty good detective, for a mystery writer.  He certainly gets beat up enough to be a real detective.

On Christmas Eve, among the nightclub hijinks there is a keepaway game with the slippers and the fast-moving plot stops long enough again for Deanna to sing “Night and Day,” this time in her upper register, unleashing a bit of her operatic chops.  Beautiful camera work lovingly follows her, and when she locks eyes with David Bruce, we know she is seducing him.  It’s not teasing now, she really wants this man.

Because her singing in this movie is at realistic moments, i.e., in a nightclub or to her father as a Christmas greeting over the phone, the film doesn’t have that launching-into-song-for-no-reason feeling of a musical.

We end up in the writer’s apartment, where Deanna is hiding out from the bad guys chasing her.  She is in his bed wearing his jammies, while he’s on the couch.  When Miss Durbin wakes, she fondly gazes at the snoring Mr. Bruce and asks his secretary, “Does he always snore like that?”

The secretary, deadpan, responds, “I am his secretary.” 

The ever-capable secretary serenely and with no end of humor attempts to cover for them when Haskell of the New York Office shows up.  She puts his robe over her clothes and says “Good morning, darling.”

That secretary’s a good egg.

It’s Christmas Day and after another melee, they end up in jail, but Dan Duryea bails her out.  Hmm, not sure that’s a good idea.  Is she safe with him?  Mr. Bellamy comes to bail her out, too. She sees a newsboy with the headlines showing the real nightclub singer was murdered.

Somebody in the old man’s family doesn’t want to share the inheritance. 

Duryea takes Durbin to the company warehouse—where the old man was murdered.  It occurs to her that he killed him.  Luckily, Ralph Bellamy shows up and they fight. Very cleverly, we are taken into the room where the murder was committed, the suspense builds and the screwball comedy is frittered away like a dying laugh.   A light shines from a suddenly passing train.

Deanna is in danger.  One of the brothers is the murderer, and she is trapped.  David Bruce finally shows up, almost bungles things, but luckily, has brought the police with him.

Cut to another train compartment, with Deanna reading another beloved mystery book, but this time, the writer is sitting across from her, in his jammies, wishing she would finish.  The soundtrack bleeding away from the rhythmic thunder of train wheels to a few cords of “The Wedding March” tells us they are married and on their honeymoon.  Impatient, he blurts out the name of the murderer to her, spoiling the story.  Her annoyance fades as the penny drops, and she rings for the porter to make up their berth.

Lady on a Train is not the acting challenge for Deanna Durbin that Christmas Holiday was the year before (which we're going to have a look at next week), but she gets to show that she was brilliant in comedy.  She clearly had a sense of the absurd. A strikingly beautiful young woman, with certainly a lovely singing voice, Durbin could have rested on those laurels alone, but fortunately for us, she, or someone at the studio, was willing to attempt more.

Christmastime was the setting of the story, but Christmas was not necessary to the telling of the story, which in turn, had no message of yuletide sentiment.  It was released in August 1945, so even cashing in as a Christmastime movie was not the point.  Beyond just about every room having a tree, we might not even remember it is Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Deanna Durbin doesn’t seem to recall it either; Haskell of the New York Office does her shopping for her.

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Come back next week for another tale with Deanna Durbin in Christmas Holiday (1944)!  It's a film noir Christmas.

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Movies in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century and Hollywood Fights Fascism.  Her latest book is Christmas in Classic Films. TO JOIN HER READERS' GROUP - follow this link for a free book as a thank-you for joining.

Thursday, November 24, 2022

A Christmas Carol (1910)

 


A Christmas Carol (1910) is the second-oldest surviving filmed adaptation of Charles Dickens’ story, and the first example we have of a pretty complete telling of the tale.  The oldest known movie was from 1901, a British film called Scrooge or Marley’s Ghost, and with only a little over three minutes in existence, that movie cuts out most of the story to center on the interaction between Scrooge and Marley.


This post is part of the countdown to Christmas coinciding with the launch of my newest book, Christmas in Classic Films.

The 1910 film is around 13 to 17 minutes, depending on which version you can find, but whisks us through much of the plot efficiently and with simple but evocative special effects requisite to the story.  Snow flies off the hat brims and clings to the shoulders of the men requesting Scrooge to donate to charity.  The ghosts are superimposed in a double exposure of trick photography.  The title cards abbreviate the bullet points in this already well-known story.


The main limitation, which perhaps adds a bit of theatricality to the film’s appearance, is that all the action takes place either Scrooge’s office or in his flat.  The Ghost of Christmas Past, (and Present, and Future) brings the scenes to him.  So Scrooge is not lifted to travel through space and time, but the images from Fezziwig’s ball, to his courtship, to the vision of his lonely death and eerie headstone all play out in corners of his room.


The movie was made by the Edison Company up in the Bronx before Hollywood was ever a gleam in anyone’s eye.  Marc McDermott plays Scrooge, a tall figure who towers over the cowering Bob Cratchit, played by Charles S. Ogle. 
Mr. McDermott, originally from Australia, trod the boards all over the world, joined Mrs. Patrick Campbell’s famous company, and eventually found a spot on Broadway.  It is remarkable that before his death at only 57 in 1929, he actually appeared in some 180 films in a twenty-year period between 1909 and 1929.  Charles Ogle, who was older but whose film career ended a few years earlier in 1926, is credited with having appeared in over 300 films.  We may assume that most of those films are lost to us, but what a telling statistic to indicate how popular movies had become and how quickly the young film industry became a powerful force in pop culture.


The story of Scrooge, with its supernatural events, was a natural for this medium.  How amazed Charles Dickens would have been.

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Come back next Thursday for a comic Christmas murder caper as Deanna Durbin is a Lady on a Train (1945)

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May I take this moment to wish my fellow Americans a very peaceful and pleasant Thanksgiving Day!

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century and Hollywood Fights Fascism.  Her latest book is Christmas in Classic Films. TO JOIN HER READERS' GROUP - follow this link for a free book as a thank-you for joining.

Thursday, November 17, 2022

Christmas scene in THE BELLS OF ST. MARY'S (1945)

 


The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945) gives us a version of a child’s telling of the Nativity, this time acted out in the tradition of the awkward parochial school Christmas pageant. 

Bing Crosby as Father O’Malley, and Ingrid Bergman, as Sr. Mary Benedict, the Sister Superior of the school, watch the rehearsal of the youngest class.


This post continues my countdown to Christmas coinciding with the launch of my newest book, Christmas in Classic Films.

Bing first sings “Adeste Fideles” to rehearse an older group of kids for the pageant, a hymn he sang on his Kraft Music Hall radio show for years every Christmas, so he didn’t need any rehearsing.  He is stunned when Sr. Benedict not only tells him to quiet down so the littler kids can rehearse in the next room, but that his services will not be needed: Christmas will go on without Crosby (at least until the advent of television, of course, when a generation grew up with his annual TV Christmas specials).  He is even more gobsmacked by the thespian talents of the children who present the Nativity with dialogue they make up as they go along. 


Bobby Dolan, Jr., is the little boy who “wrote” the script and plays Joseph.  He hoists a taller Mary onto a sawhorse donkey, seemingly without hurting himself though he is a little winded, and they proceed to be rejected by innkeepers through the parted proscenium curtain. 

Somebody’s wandering little brother gets to be Baby Jesus.  It’s a funny skit because it comes off exactly as it’s meant to: unrehearsed and purely a project of make-believe.  Sr. Benedict’s amusement at their theatrical, not to say liturgical, mess is priceless, and her allowing of it makes her a mensch of a nun. 

Little Bobby, clearly a trouper, was the son of film exec, composer and music director for MGM Robert Emmet Dolan.  He also had an uncredited bit part in Going My Way the previous year, which first brought Father O’Malley to us and gave Bing an Oscar.  Bobby had only one more movie before his film career apparently ended.  His Joseph may not have been the authoritative representation, but it clearly had Ingrid Bergman’s imprimatur.

(Come back next week for a look at an early silent version of A Christmas Carol...from 1910!)

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century and Hollywood Fights Fascism. TO JOIN HER READERS' GROUP - follow this link for a free book as a thank-you for joining.

Thursday, November 10, 2022

We're No Angels (1955)

 


We’re No Angels (1955) cheekily teases us about our own Christmas sentimentality with an unabashed romp of black humor and goofy good will toward men.  And a murder.




This is my entry into the Classic Movie Blog Association's "Movies are Murder" blogathon.  Have a look at the site here to see the other great blogs.


This post also serves as my intro to a countdown to Christmas coinciding with the launch of my newest book, Christmas in Classic Films.

It is Christmas Eve, 1895 in French Guiana, where three convicts have escaped from the prison at Devil’s Island.  They are Humphrey Bogart, Peter Ustinov, and Aldo Ray.  They do not shoot it out to escape, but rather employ playful charm and Boy Scout-like helpfulness to hide with the family of a local storekeeper until they can board a ship that will take them away back to France and freedom.  The only real weapon they have is their wits and Adolphe, a poisonous snake.

The storekeeper is Leo G. Carroll, befuddled and incompetent, who allows the convicts to repair his roof, not knowing they have escaped.  Joan Bennett is his flighty wife, and Gloria Talbot is his teenage daughter, who spends much of the movie fainting and being carried around by lecherous Aldo Ray.

Basil Rathbone is the wealthy owner of the store, who arrives with his son to take over the business because it is so badly run and unprofitable.  Rathbone is a delightfully first-rate villain, an obnoxious, arrogant, sneering scene stealer who forbids his son to have anything to do with Gloria Talbot, and breaks up their budding romance, not that the son seems to mind that much.  He knows which side his bread is buttered on.

The convicts step in to help Mr. Carroll’s family—they work as sales clerks, they artfully fix up his ledger, they arrange a magnificent Christmas dinner for the family with little luxuries they have stolen.  It’s not certain if they like Carroll’s family so much or just hate Basil Rathbone with a passion, but they stay to defend the family, even to the point of killing Rathbone and his son.

Well, they don’t actually do it.  Adolphe, the snake, bites them, but the convicts let him.



Some charming moments are finding Bogie completely at home cooking in the kitchen wearing a pink frilly apron as if to dare us to laugh, and the trio singing the hymn, “Three Angels,” which they perform for the family.

The dialogue is fast and witty, and very dark.  They frankly and disarmingly discuss their crimes, display a taste for violence with odd joie de vivre, and the film generally defies not only our usual expectations of Christmas sentiment, but our pedestrian need for logic. Director Michael Curtiz’s last movie before this was the tippity-top of all Christmas movies, White Christmas (1954).  Perhaps his own sense of irony required a palate cleanser.

When the family is safe and the opportunity presents itself for the convicts to catch their boat to freedom, they instead decide to return to prison, because it wasn’t so bad and people on the outside are not very nice.  Except for their new little family, which they decide they can always visit when they break out of prison next Christmas.  They walk away from the camera, and three halos are superimposed above their heads.  And over the little cage Aldo Ray carries that holds Adolphe.

But we know, they’re no angels.  Unless, of course, angels can be temporary manifestations when we need them.


Don't forget to check out the other blogs in CMBA's "Movies are Murder" Blogathon!

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century and Hollywood Fights Fascism. TO JOIN HER READERS' GROUP - follow this link for a free book as a thank-you for joining.

Thursday, November 3, 2022

Christmas in Classic Films -- eBook launch TODAY!


My long-awaited (for me, anyway) launch of Christmas in Classic Films has finally come TODAY!  The eBook version is now available on Amazon exclusively, and for the first two days (today and Friday, November 4th) will be sold for $1.99!  Beginning Saturday, the price will be set to its regular $2.99, so save a buck and buy today or tomorrow.


The print version of the book will be available beginning Sunday, November 6th at its regular price of $11.99.  If you're looking for some paperback stocking stuffers this holiday season, you can't get any more Christmas-y than this.

The book is dedicated with love to the memory of our dear Paddy Nolan-Hall, aka The Caftan Woman.

  Here's where you can pre-order your eBook now!

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century and Hollywood Fights Fascism. TO JOIN HER READERS' GROUP - follow this link for a free book as a thank-you for joining.

 

Thursday, October 27, 2022

Bing, the Headless Horseman, and Halloween...


Have a listen to this favorite at my house -- Bing Crosby's rendition of "The Headless Horseman" from the Disney cartoon The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, which is the second half of The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949).  Here Bing performs it on his radio show on 
October 26, 1949, ably assisted by John Scott Trotter directing the orchestra and The Rhythmaires on background vocals. 

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Next Thursday, we move abruptly to another holiday -- when my book, Christmas in Classic Films is published.  More on that next week.  Until then, enjoy your Halloween treats and, hopefully, no tricks.

Thursday, October 13, 2022

Angela Lansbury -- Requiescat in Pace


While we mourn the passing of Angela Lansbury, we also are moved to celebrate her long, loving, generous life and an extraordinary career of some 80 years.

Some of her film work has been mentioned on this blog previously, such as roles in The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (1960), her debut role in Gaslight (1944), as well as two episodes of her beloved television series Murder She Wrote"Reflections of the Mind" with Ann Blyth, and a mention of her clever "sequel" as Jessica Fletcher sorts out the solution from a 1949 movie Strange Bargain.

As a theatre fan, I always looked forward to her appearances at the Tony Awards (she won 5 Tonys).  Here's a reunion of Miss Angela and Bea Arthur reprising their roles from Mame.

She did it all.  She adapted to each era and each new audience.  Had there never been a 12-year run of Murder She Wrote on TV, or her voice work in animated features such as Beauty and the Beast where her rendition of the title song still charms and breaks the heart -- she would still have had a prestigious place in the history of film.  But she just didn't stop there, and there was no reason to.  She embraced all opportunities.  We should all be so lucky as to carry her sense of purpose and enjoyment of life.

She was just five days shy of her 97th birthday.  I wish there could have been at least one more adventure with Jessica Fletcher, but I'm glad I have some DVDs to visit my old friend from time to time.

Angela Lansbury doesn't require mourning from us; she deserves, rather, a standing ovation.

Thursday, October 6, 2022

FREE -- HOLLYWOOD FIGHTS FASCISM

 


Hollywood Fights Fascism, selected essays on classic films from this blog, is now available for the next four days for FREE in eBook form.  Get your copy from Amazon here.


Our greatest gift from the Greatest Generation was freedom from fascism. Relive, and celebrate, how evil was faced, discussed, dramatized...and fought. Classic films were the weapon.

The Greatest Generation received instruction, inspiration, and, of course, entertainment from a source that affected them perhaps even more than the greater technology of generations to follow: the movies.

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century. Her newspaper column on classic films, Silver Screen, Golden Memories is syndicated nationally.  Her new book, a collection of posts from this blog - Hollywood Fights Fascism - is available here on Amazon.

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Christmas in Classic Films


I'm pleased to announce my forthcoming book, Christmas in Classic Films, is now available for pre-order as an eBook.  

It's a collection of essays on yuletide-themed movies, mostly from this blog.  The book will go on sale Thursday, November 3rd, and the print version will follow soon after.

For the first few months it will be available exclusively from Amazon, and afterwards from a variety of online shops.

Here's the blurb:

Christmas turns everyone who celebrates it into a classic film fan—at least for that special season.

The average person, unlike devoted classic film fans, may not recognize images of Clark Gable or know who James Wong Howe was, or be able to tell you why 1939 was such a spectacular year for films. But when yuletide rolls around, they rejoice with 
Miracle on 34th StreetIt’s a Wonderful Life, and of course, White Christmas.

We find a vast treasure of Christmas scenes in films that were never meant to be “Christmas movies” but which are now part of the holiday canon, and this collection of essays spotlighting Christmas in classic films brings you all the warmth and memories that have become as dear a custom as decorating your home and holiday baking. You may even have one of these movies on in the background when you’re writing out your Christmas cards.

Unwrap this package and relive the moments and discover Christmas nostalgia anew, from Cary Grant’s mysterious angel in 
The Bishop’s Wife to poor Ralphie pining for a Red Ryder BB-gun in A Christmas Story.

There’s lots more here waiting for you under the tree.


Pre-order your eBook now, and it will be sent to your device on November 3rd!

I'll be contacting readers of my newsletter with the opportunity to receive an ARC (a FREE advance reader copy) of the eBook with the invitation -- but not the obligation -- to review the book.  If you're interested in receiving an ARC, sign on here.

If you're already on my readers' list, don't worry -- you'll get your offer of a FREE ARC in a few days!

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century. Her newspaper column on classic films, Silver Screen, Golden Memories is syndicated nationally.  Her new book, a collection of posts from this blog - Hollywood Fights Fascism - is available here on Amazon.

Monday, September 19, 2022

John Greco - Harbor House and Other Dark Tales


John Greco, your friend and mine from the Twenty Four Frames blog, has released a new book that will raise the hackles on fans of horror and dark tales.  Harbor House and Other Dark Tales is a collection of 16 short stories, each with a twist you might not expect.

It's his seventh book of fiction.  In previous posts, I've featured his books Lessons in the Dark, a nonfiction collection of essays on film; and two other collections of sinister stories: Devious Tales here; and The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice here. 

John's talent is not limited to writing; he is an exceptional photographer, and his art prints and photos, including many stunning shots of wildlife, can be purchased here at John Greco Art.

Harbor House and Other Dark Tales is available on Kindle and in paperback.  

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In the interests of transparency:  I received an ARC of John's book, with no requirement to write a review.

Thursday, September 15, 2022

Requiescat in pace - Marsha Hunt


Marsha Hunt left us last week at 104 years old, a sparkling human being of whom we can truly say had a life well lived.  There are fewer film actors from the 1930s left to us these days, so it is remarkable that the lady came to Hollywood -- and thereby to us classic film fans -- in 1935.

She played opposite everyone:  John Wayne before his stardom took off, John Barrymore, Mickey Rooney, Lana Turner, Laurence Olivier, Greer Garson...you name it.  Of the last two mentioned, we covered her work in Pride and Prejudice (1940) here.  Her role as Mary is some of the best moments of the film:  

"In Marsha Hunt we have one of the funniest Mary Bennetts on screen, with her broad, almost campy playing of the unattractive and dull sister, particularly in her too-eager reaction when her mother admonishes her to smile at a party. The sour note she hits in her performance of “Flow Gently, Sweet Afton” is priceless."

Mary has been played by others as awkward and foolish, dour and pompous, but Marsha Hunt captured the absurdity in the character that I think Jane Austen would have applauded. 

Marsha Hunt had a sense of humor and a sense of humanity, and she would need it.  In 1950, she was blacklisted and the Radical Right, by means of Hollywood, torched her career.  The blacklisting episode, an era that ruined the careers and lives of many liberals and progressives in the film industry, is what seems to have been most captured in the headlines about her passing.  We covered her work in the radio program Hollywood Fights Back here.

But she was more than someone who got thrown under the bus for her integrity.  She went to work in theatre, which is famously tolerant and wonderfully belligerent to those who are intolerant, and we mentioned her appearance at the LaJolla Playhouse.

She was, above all, a humanitarian, and worked on behalf of the poverty-stricken, the homeless, the hungry for many decades.  In her work, and in her life, she was a champion.

The 2015 documentary, Marsha Hunt's Sweet Adversity tells her story, and if it pops up again on TCM, which I expect it may in a tribute to her, don't miss it.

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Jacqueline T. Lynch is the author of Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. and Memories in Our Time - Hollywood Mirrors and Mimics the Twentieth Century. Her newspaper column on classic films, Silver Screen, Golden Memories is syndicated nationally.  Her new book, a collection of posts from this blog - Hollywood Fights Fascism - is available here on Amazon.


Thursday, September 8, 2022

FREE TODAY - HOLLYWOOD FIGHTS FASCISM


Free today at Amazon - Hollywood Fights Fascism.

Download your free eBook today only at this link.

Our greatest gift from the Greatest Generation was freedom from fascism. Relive, and celebrate, how evil was faced, discussed, dramatized...and fought. Classic films were the weapon.

The Greatest Generation received instruction, inspiration, and, of course, entertainment from a source that affected them perhaps even more than the greater technology of generations to follow: the movies.

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