Monday, March 16, 2009

The Wearing of the Grin (1951)



“The Wearing of the Grin” (1951) serves as our nod to St. Patrick’s Day tomorrow, and gives us not only a funny, and a bit scary, vehicle for Porky Pig, but treats us to a riotous parody of “The Red Shoes”, both the Hans Christian Andersen story and most especially the 1948 movie with Moira Shearer. I can’t help wondering if director Chuck Jones and writer Michael Maltese were aiming for Moira more than Hans Christian. I think they were going after Moira.

8 comments:

Lolita said...

I love the LSD feeling of these old cartoons!
The beginning seems a little Dracula like, does it not? The Leprechauns were simply adorable.

Jacqueline T Lynch said...

Hi, Lolita, thanks for stopping by. It's a fun cartoon. Chuck Jones was especially adept at parodies. I love his opera parodies. I don't think anybody but Jones and Maltese would think of combining a horror movie setting with "The Red Shoes" and throwing in Porky Pig.

MovieMan0283 said...

Ditto Lolita. These cartoons have such a great free-floating logic, from Ireland to old horror movies to Kafkaesque trials to The Red Shoes to Salvador Dali...all in the space of 7 minutes (I always loved the free association of Yellow Submarine, but can you see the same effect, at a more manic pace, in the old Warners toons...)

Jacqueline T Lynch said...

Agreed, MovieMan. Thanks for your input. I'd love to have been a fly on the wall when they were hashing out the storyboards.

Lolita said...

MovieMan0283 is so right! But I guess that Yellow Submarine is a little slower so all the grass smoking viewers still can hang on to the story.

Jacqueline T Lynch said...

"Yellow Submarine is a little slower so all the grass smoking viewers still can hang on to the story." Too funny.

John Hayes said...

This was fantastic. I've watched a lot of old Loony Toons but don't remember this one. The Dali-esque forest of pipes was something else. Great St. Patrick's post (I know I'm behind times, but was away much of the week).

Jacqueline T Lynch said...

Hi, John. Glad you're back. Yes, this was an imaginative one. I'm not surprised you don't remember this one, I really don't think it's too well known. I can remember it being shown around St. Patrick's Day when I was child, but never at any other time. This cartoon must have spent a lot of time in the vault.